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Curriculum Information

 

The Maths Curriculum:

 

Our school’s Mathematics’ Curriculum follows the National Curriculum for Mathematics and the Foundation Stage Statutory Framework.  We aim to ensure that there is an emphasis on Maths skills which encourages appropriate connections to be made between all the aspects of the Maths curriculum. In the EYFS the mathematics curriculum is based on and supported by the early learning goals for mathematical developments.

 

Here at Hobletts Manor Infants' and Nursery School, we follow the mastery approach.  Mastering maths means pupils acquiring a deep, long-term, secure and adaptable understanding of the subject.

The phrase ‘teaching for mastery’ describes the elements of classroom practice and school organisation that combine to give pupils the best chances of mastering maths.  Achieving mastery means acquiring a solid enough understanding of the maths that’s been taught to enable pupils to move on to more advanced material.

 

To support the planning of Maths in our school, we use ESSENTIALmaths.  This tool has been designed by Herts for Learning to benefit teachers and children by providing carefully planned progression that helps us to ensure consistency throughout the school.  The use of concrete and pictorial representations, that benefits pupils’ learning, is a strong feature of our planning and teaching in line with the master approach that we follow.   Within our planning, we are careful to provide much opportunity for all learners to deepen and extend mathematical thinking.

 

In the EYFS children access a language rich environment where Maths development is supported through practical experiences in order to promote social skills and the development of mathematical language and understanding.

· Concepts of shape, space, direction, size, length, capacity and mass are developed through sand, water and tactile play, outdoor provision, small world play, story-telling and songs.

· Children are also taught basics of number; 1 to 1 correspondence, number order and recognition. Role play situations provide opportunities for using and applying knowledge and problem solving.

· By the end of Reception the children write digits and calculations as well as recognise them and work with them practically to meet the expectations of the Early Years Goals as outlined in the EYFS.

 

In KS1 children have daily Maths sessions following the National Curriculum.

The principal focus of mathematics teaching in key stage 1 is to ensure that pupils develop confidence and mental fluency with whole numbers, counting and place value. This should involve working with numerals, words and the 4 operations, including with practical resources [for example, concrete objects and measuring tools].

At this stage, pupils should develop their ability to recognise, describe, draw, compare and sort different shapes and use the related vocabulary. Teaching should also involve using a range of measures to describe and compare different quantities such as length, mass, capacity/volume, time and money.

 

In Year 1, children will start to build confidence working with numbers, through developing their counting and calculation skills. They will also gain an understanding of halves and quarters, start to measure and tell the time, and learn about some 2D and 3D shapes.

Children will be taught to count forwards and backwards to 100, add and subtract numbers to 20, and be introduced to the idea of multiplying and dividing. They will be encouraged to use objects to help them solve simple problems in a practical way.

 

In Year 2, children will continue to develop their counting and calculation skills, learning different ways to multiply and divide. They will also extend their understanding of fractions. They will measure length, weight, volume, temperature, time and money, discover more about 2D and 3D shapes, and begin to learn about statistics.  They’ll count in steps of 2, 3, 5 and 10 and learn number bonds to 20. They’ll partition numbers into 10s and 1s to add and subtract one-digit and two-digit numbers. They will be taught the 2, and 10 times tables and how to find  1/2 , 1/4,  3/4 and 1/3   of quantities and shapes.

By the end of year 2, pupils should know the number bonds to 20 and be precise in using and understanding place value. An emphasis on practice at this early stage will aid fluency.  Pupils should read and spell mathematical vocabulary, at a level consistent with their increasing word reading and spelling knowledge at key stage 1.

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